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Attack and Blessing on the Family

Posted on August 26, 2020 at 3:20 PM

Dear Saints,

 

Because the family system was designed by God to reflect his character of love it is little wonder that we have so much opposition. From the creation account in Genesis we learn that God intends to use the family system but the Enemy immediately tried to destroy that system through a subtle attack deceiving the woman and tempting the man. Using one of the most beautiful creatures God had made, the serpent, Satan deceived the woman into thinking that she really needed that forbidden fruit of the tree of the knowledge of good and evil. From the Genesis account of this attack we learn that this particular creature, the serpent, was radically different than the snakes of today in that it was able to communicate with Eve. Besides its beauty and ability to speak it most likely walked upright and developed a close relationship with the first couple.

 

Behind that talking family “pet” was Satan working out his plan to destroy the family system and usurp the authority of God. By emphasizing the negative command not to eat of the fruit, Satan deceived the woman into thinking that God was keeping her from something she thought she had to have. The deception was complete when the woman saw that the forbidden fruit was good to eat, something that would give her pleasure, and something she needed to be as wise as Adam. The lie created by the Enemy was that she needed more than what God had already given her to make her complete. Acting on that lie she took the fruit and ate it in direct rebellion to God’s command.

 

Notice that when the woman ate the forbidden fruit nothing happened. She didn’t fall over dead, so when she gave it to her husband to eat it looked like the smart snake was right. It wasn’t till Adam ate the fruit that the full consequences of their sin took its toll on them individually as well as the family system. Adam’s sin of unbelief was not so much concerning the forbidden fruit, but in his choosing the woman over God. While Eve was deceived, Adam made the choice to obey his wife rather than God. Eve’s unbelief was “I will be worthy if I eat the fruit” while Adams unbelief was “I will be worthy if I can keep my wife”. Both failed to trust God for their needs, but Adam was held responsible for their sin.

 

The immediate effect of their sin is seen in the way their own self image changed. Their eyes were open to their own nakedness and they both were ashamed and afraid. The change in their self image was from innocence to guilty and their selfishness increased as they shifted the blame for their sin onto others. Adam blamed his wife and she blamed the smart snake. Neither one of them accepted responsibility for their action but were afraid of God. Their only unity appears to be in trying their best to cover their own nakedness by sewing fig leaves together to cover their nakedness. This attempt to cover their nakedness is symbolic of our natural efforts to make ourselves look good through acts of self-righteousness.

 

Their pitiful attempt to cover their shame may have given them both a temporary sense of security and respect, but when faced with the presence of God they hid themselves in the very garden God had made for them. Calling out to Adam God demonstrated his unconditional love for his fallen children. He wasn’t playing a game of hide ‘n seek with them, but rather was pointing out their inability to save themselves. After explaining the consequences of their sin He gave what is called by theologians the “protoevangelium” or the “first gospel” in Genesis 3:15. There he promised that although the “seed of the serpent” would “bruise his heel” (a reference to the cross) the “seed of the woman” (Christ) would “crush” the head of the serpent. Despite his ability to cause pain in the family system; Jesus, as the promised seed, would bless all families of the earth with a final victory.

 

John

 

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